Art, Collections, Exhibitions, Inspirational Women, Uncategorized

Watercolour At War: Ruth Adams

By Becky Gee

Becky Gee is the curator of the new collections display Watercolour At War at the Laing Art Gallery. For Becky, the most rewarding part of curating the exhibition was having the time to research artist Ruth Adams and to put on display a number of her works for the first time. 


I knew very little about Ruth Adams (1893 – 1948) when I decided to include her 1937 double-sided watercolour The Eagles in the latest exhibition at the Laing Art Gallery. Watercolour at War examines the limitations faced by artists in wartime Britain and The Eagles perfectly illustrates how artists were reusing materials, Adams using both sides of the paper to experiment with seemingly entirely different ideas. It was only through a chance encounter in the paintings store at the Shipley Art Gallery, did I finally get the lead I’d been looking for, sparking a whirlwind of research that has resulted in a much clearer picture of this artist’s life, work and artistic connections.

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Ruth Adams, The Eagles (side 1), 1937 [pen, ink, watercolour, bodycolour and pencil on paper)
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A Letter To My 16 Year-Old Self

A Letter To My 16 Year-Old Self: Mandy Barker

By Mandy Barker

Mandy Barker is the founder and Creative Director of independent branding studio Sail Creative, who puts social change and impact at the heart of all she does: “design doesn’t only need to look good – it can do good too”. Read on to find out what advice she would give to her 16 year-old self.


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Mandy Barker and Danni Gilbert of Sail Creative. Credit: Sail Creative.

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Collections, Inspirational Women, Maritime, Power & Influence, Social History, Uncategorized

On War Service: Women’s Work During WWI

By Gemma Ashby (Project Co-ordinator for the Women of Tyneside project)

This blog was inspired by the incredible story of Jane Anne Cawthorn, a munitionette from Tyneside during World War I, shared with us recently by Jane’s great-granddaughter. 

As many of us know, this year is the 100th anniversary of some women gaining the right to vote in the UK for the first time. Women’s changing roles in society, and more specifically the workplace, during the First World War is often cited as being one of the main reasons as to why this landmark legislation was passed in 1918.

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Male and female workers at Wallsend Slipway & Engineering Company 1914-1918 (TWCMS: 2014.1259).

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A Letter To My 16 Year-Old Self

A Letter To My 16 Year-Old Self: Danni Gilbert

By Danni Gilbert

Danni Gilbert is the Graphic Designer for independent branding studio Sail Creative, who have been behind the incredible branding of our project. Sail prioritise empowerment of their clients and work to inspire and create change with their designs for projects. Read on to find out what advice Danni would give to her 16 year-old self.


 

Sail Twitter logo

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Collections, Costume, Power & Influence

Symbolism of jackets: military & tailored

By Karen Johnston

As part of the Women of Tyneside project, placement student Karen Johnston explores a series of themes represented in the costume and social history collections. In this blog post about tailored jackets, the theme of female power is explored.


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Woman’s woollen two piece suit, manufactured for Marks & Spencers (1985). The owner of this suit wore it regularly in her position at Newcastle City Library, as she felt expected to wear ‘power’ jackets and needed her clothing to reflect her authority. TWCMS : 2002.1472

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Art, Collections, Exhibitions, Inspirational Women

Louisa Hodgson: A New Perspective

By Becky Gee

Becky Gee is Exhibitions Officer at the Laing Art Gallery, Hatton Gallery and Shipley Art Gallery. She has recently been researching the North East-born artist Louisa Hodgson. The exhibition Louisa Hodgson : A New Perspective at the Hatton is a culmination of this research.


Louisa Hodgson was one of the few artists of the 20th century to embrace the revival of the medium of tempera. Born in Monkseaton in 1905, she worked in the North East for her entire life. The whereabouts of many of her paintings is currently unknown with only six being held in UK public collections. Overall there are around 150 paintings, drawings and sketchbooks in the Laing Art Gallery and Hatton Gallery collections. Many of these are brought together in the current exhibition Louisa Hodgson : A New Perspective, on display at the Hatton until 11 August 2018.

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Louisa Hodgson, The Collingwood Monument, Tynemouth, Trafalgar Night, 1930-8. Laing Art Gallery.

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Body Image, Collections, Costume

Wedding Dresses

By Karen Johnston

As part of the Women of Tyneside project, placement student Karen Johnston explores a series of themes represented in the costume and social history collections. In this blog post about wedding dresses, the theme of body image is explored.


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Bride wearing homemade wedding dress, made from a Vogue dress design by the bride’s mother. The dress was made to a bridesmaid pattern due to the longer bridal style being out of fashion at the time (1969). TWCMS : 2011.922.1

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